New research: Harlem Children’s Zone replication premature? [audio, video]

An article in the current issue of City Limits (“‘There is no science’: Canada’s philosophy“), and a Brian Lehrer WNYC interview with the article’s author and Paul Tough (whom I interviewed when he visited Springfield), evaluate Geoffrey Canada’s much-lauded work. The result: We won’t know how successful this intensive wrap-around approach is for another decade. That’s when the current cohort of young people graduate–or don’t graduate–from college. So the question becomes: Is the Obama Administration jumping the gun promoting HCZ replication nationally (especially given how dependent the model is on accountability and measurable results), or is this exactly the kind of bold and aggressive approach that can help break the cycle of poverty, close the achievement gap, and turn around urban America? Also check out the trailer below for the forthcoming movie, “The Lottery,” about education innovation and what’s at stake.

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3 Responses

  1. Is thinking about our children’s future a premature issue?

    Obviously Urban America continues to face the many challenges with poverty and education. We should not stop the progress of an ambitious plan that addresses a large scale issue.

    If premature or not, the reality is Canada’s work is creating some changes. Changes to the way we think about poverty and education. The pressure is on to show outcomes however by shedding light to this issue whether its successful or not, we can guarantee that others will learn a lesson and continue to commit to create social changes.

    The reality is there is an urgency to change the future of our children. The real question is how many more children have to fail before we invest in our future? Seriously we spend money on other issues why not invest in a project that can lead to changes for the most vulnerable.

  2. […] have made these points about funding and a lack of evidence for HCZ’s basic claims in previous posts. But questions about the value of HCZ’s holistic approach don’t sit well with us. We […]

  3. […] have made these points about funding and inconclusive evidence for HCZ’s basic claims in previous posts. But questions about the value of HCZ’s holistic approach don’t sit well with us. We […]

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